Video Games + Creativity?

Came across an interesting article where scientists sought out relationships between creativity and a variety of info technologies: computers, the Internet, videogames, and cell phones.

So they took 491 children with an average age of 12 years old who were recruited from 20 middle schools. The experimenters used a TTCT figural question and a TTCT verbal question. I’ve used the figural one in my own experiment, but not the verbal one (see end of this post for questions).

Jumping to the conclusion…the results actually indicated a relationship between videogame playing (regardless of type of videogame) and creativity. No other type of information technology showed any relationships. And these are high correlations –> video games = .50, .35, .41, .39 whereas the others are only .02, .01, -.05, etc. There were no gender or race differences either. Maybe in the future video games can be directed more towards creativity? Also, more studies need to be carried out to validate this claim and also check out if computational thinking is related to video game playing too.

Guilty confession: I grew up very immersed in playing Pokemon, Age of Empires, Age of Mythology, Warcraft, The SIMS…alas, it has revealed itself.

sciencedaily.com

The first stimulus took the form of an “egg” presented alone on a blank sheet of paper. Instructions were as follows:
On the following page is a curved shape. Think of a picture or object that you can draw with this shape as a part of it. Try to think of a picture that no one else will think of. Keep adding new ideas to your first idea to make it tell as interesting and exciting a story as you can. When you have completed your picture make up a name or title for it and write this in the space provided under your picture. After you have drawn your picture and given it a title, come back to this page and write a story about your picture in the space below.
The second stimulus was a picture of an elf-like figure lying in front of a small pool of water, staring at its reflection in the water. Instructions were as follows:
Look at the picture. Think about what is happening. What can you tell is happening for sure? What do you need to know to understand what is happening, what caused it to happen, and what will happen next, as a result? After you have looked at the picture and thought about these questions then go to the next page, after the picture.
The next three pages contained the following instructions:
Write out all of the QUESTIONS you can think of about the picture. Ask all the questions you need to ask to know for sure what is happening. Do not ask questions that can be answered just by looking at the picture. You can look back at the picture as much as you want to.
List as many possible CAUSES as you can think of for the activity (what is happening) in the picture. You may use things that might have happened just before the things that are happening in the picture, or you can use things that happened a long time ago that made the things in the picture happen. Make as many guesses as you like. Don’t be afraid to guess. You can look back at the picture as much as you want to.
List as many POSSIBILITIES as you can think of for what might happen next as a result of what is happening in the picture. You may use things that might happen right afterward, or you can use things that might happen long afterward, in the future. Make as many guesses as you can. Don’t be afraid to guess. You can look back at the picture as much as you want to.

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